Fabulous Oil Painting of Fighting Dogs by James Ward RA 1769 - 1859

Fabulous Oil Painting of Fighting Dogs by James Ward 1769 - 1859 Superb painting which is initialled and recorded in catalogue raisonne. Measurements are: 47cm x 43cm including the frame or sight size is 35.5.cm x 30cm. Wonderful condition ready for the home. Delivery to any UK address is included in the asking price. Please do enquire if you require a shipping quote as we can delivery worldwide. — More Information

Item Ref: 9

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James Ward
Born in London, and younger brother of William Ward the engraver, James Ward was influenced by many people, but his career is conventionally divided into two periods: until 1803, his single greatest influence was his brother in law George Morland; from that time, it was Rubens. From 1810 or so, Ward started to paint horses within landscapes; slightly later, he turned to very large-scale landscapes, of which Gordale Scar (Tate, London), completed in 1814 or 1815 and depicting Gordale Scar (Yorkshire) as an example of the sublime, is considered his masterpiece and a masterpiece of English Romantic painting.[1]


Gordale Scar
Ward devoted much of the period 1815-21 to the painting of a gigantic work titled Allegory of Waterloo (now lost); this neither was much praised nor brought in the revenue Ward had hoped for. The experience may have embittered him, and the deaths of his first wife and a daughter were among other tragedies. Like many artists of the time, Ward sought commissions from wealthy gentry of their favorite horses, their favorite hunting dogs or their children.[2]

One such family that Ward painted and drew repeatedly, and whom he counted among his friends, were the Levett family of Wynchnor Park, Staffordshire. One of Ward's best-known portraits was his Theophilus Levett hunting at Wychnor, Staffordshire of 1817.[3] Another was Ward's 1811 painting entitled The Reverend Thomas Levett and his favourite dogs, cock-shooting. Ward also painted a group portrait of three Levett children — John, Theophilus and Frances Levett.[4